Conference Programme

09 - 12 September 2019   |   Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre
H.H. Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of The United Arab Emirates

Programme is subject to change. Please check back regularly for updates on sessions and the speakers.

09:00 09:50

Keynote - New Visions of Energy for Prosperity

10:00 11:15

Opening Session

11:45 15:30

Interactive Parallel Sessions

8 Sessions

Digitalisation and future energy systems

The energy system is undergoing a digital transformation. Artificial Intelligence, Internet of things, Big Data, Distributed Ledgers/Blockchain and enabled solutions are revolutionising the way we produce and consume energy. These new technologies will lead to unprecedented levels of efficiency, disintermediation, new business models, improved supply chain management and capital allocation effectiveness, enhanced system resilience and require new ways of thinking. Questions 1) What are examples where digitalisation has already changed energy realities? 2) What are some of the most exciting visions that rely on digital opportunities? 3) What are the main obstacles and challenges associated with digitalisation and how can these be addressed?

Energy storage: Trends and drivers

Energy storage solutions are a critical innovation area at the heart of the energy transition as they enable deeper renewables integration and penetration, roll out of off-grid solutions, enable e-mobility and support system resilience. It is a giant opportunity for development and a booming area of research as the industry tracks technologies that may transform energy systems. This session will explore the latest developments in the energy storage space, going beyond batteries and thinking about Power-to-X, digital flexibilization of existing assets and sector coupling solutions and consider the scope of collaboration and investment required to exploit the opportunities. Questions 1) What are some of the most dynamic developments in the storage space? 2) How will these new storage solutions change the system as we know it? 3) What are some of the key risks or potential challenges with these new storage solutions?

The future of nuclear

Nuclear technologies remain one of the most divisive subjects in the energy market, with the challenges of capital cost and the perception of risk balanced against energy security, environmental concerns and an integral role in a better strategic energy future mix. This session explores the changing perspectives on nuclear energy’s role in the future energy system, the challenges and the opportunities for international cooperation alongside national priorities and explores the prospects for nuclear energy at the heart of an energy transition that delivers prosperity for all. Is a new story of nuclear energy emerging and, if so, what is “new” about it? Questions 1) How is the role of nuclear in the energy transition changing and why? 2) Are/how are political, social and investor attitudes to nuclear energy changing? 3) Which technological innovations will most impact the future of nuclear by 2040/2060? 4) Which countries will shape the future of nuclear energy to 2040 and how?

Future of mobility

To accommodate some of the world’s major trends, the transport and logistics industry is undergoing a major shift in the way it thinks and operates. Mobility is set to become a user-orientated service, designed to offer an integrated reactive multimodal service. Meanwhile industry leaders have started formulating 2050 zero net carbon ambition. Four key trends driving this change that have the potential to be hugely disruptive to the industry are new players, user-focused end to end service, new technologies and solutions, and changing business models. Questions 1) What are some of the most dynamic developments in transport innovation? 2) What are critical success factors that are needed to deliver intelligent low-carbon mobility systems? 3) How will these changes impact the energy sector?

The circular economy: What is a realistic outlook?

Corporate leaders have recognized that it is inevitable that our society must make a fundamental shift from “take, make, dispose” to one that recovers and reuses materials. This is the basis of the circular economy, in which corporations no longer focus on increasing volume and squeezing out cost through greater efficiency in supply chains, factories and operations, but move to a circular, low-carbon economy in which companies concentrate on rethinking products and services from the bottom up to prepare for inevitable constraints on resource consumption.

The role of hydrogen in a sustainable and secure energy future

While electrification is an important part of the energy transition solution, electrons alone cannot deliver an economically effective decarbonisation path. Meanwhile, airline transport, shipping, heavy duty transport, and important segments of heavy industry will continue to rely on liquid or gaseous fuels for a long time to come. An increasing number of countries are looking at opportunities to gradually green existing fossil based supply chains of chemicals with strong hydrogen content (such as ammonia, methanol, formic acid) by producing these through geothermal energy, Power-to-X or other processes that reduce CO2 emissions and use these as energy feedstock, e.g. as input to retrofitted coal plants or fuel cells. Despite important technological and economic challenges, interest in this ‘hydrogen economy 4.0’ is quickly growing, with Japan aiming to get 40 percent of all its energy from hydrogen by 2050 and last year, the world’s first passenger train powered by hydrogen fuel cells began operation in Germany. Questions 1) What are existing projects and examples of such supply chain greening and infrastructure repurposing? 2) What are success factors for such gradual greening to take scale and speed? 3) How can we avoid the risk of dismantling existing (gas & liquids) infrastructure that can serve as backbone for a future hydrogen economy?

New visions of energy: Succeeding in a context of disruption

Energy transition is nothing new but achieving a timely, managed and global energy transition presents an unprecedented challenge. An emerging landscape of challenges and exponential growth opportunities exists across whole systems, and ‘Constellations of Disruption’ [sets of innovations that in combination have the potential to disrupt existing supply chains] are reshaping energy systems innovation. No country, company, city or community can achieve the global energy transition alone or all at once, and connecting across countries, sectors, stakeholders and with more diverse policy shapers is essential. How can we make sense of the global and local developments that are reshaping the future outlook for energy systems everywhere? How do we ensure prosperity and competitiveness of our countries and companies in a period of rapid change?

New technology frontiers

With energy demand growing rapidly and the global anticipation of a carbon-constrained future, transforming the way we generate, supply, transmit, store and use energy has become a defining challenge of the 21st century. Radical new technologies driven by strong alliances and partnership across companies and businesses, with academic institutions, as well as policymakers and regulators are needed. This session looks at how the public and private sector can harness change to deliver a successful transition through new materials, fuels, processes and thinking.

11:45

Digitalisation and future energy systems

More

The energy system is undergoing a digital transformation. Artificial Intelligence, Internet of things, Big Data, Distributed Ledgers/Blockchain and enabled solutions are revolutionising the way we produce and consume energy. These new technologies will lead to unprecedented levels of efficiency, disintermediation, new business models, improved supply chain management and capital allocation effectiveness, enhanced system resilience and require new ways of thinking. Questions 1) What are examples where digitalisation has already changed energy realities? 2) What are some of the most exciting visions that rely on digital opportunities? 3) What are the main obstacles and challenges associated with digitalisation and how can these be addressed?

11:45

Energy storage: Trends and drivers

More

Energy storage solutions are a critical innovation area at the heart of the energy transition as they enable deeper renewables integration and penetration, roll out of off-grid solutions, enable e-mobility and support system resilience. It is a giant opportunity for development and a booming area of research as the industry tracks technologies that may transform energy systems. This session will explore the latest developments in the energy storage space, going beyond batteries and thinking about Power-to-X, digital flexibilization of existing assets and sector coupling solutions and consider the scope of collaboration and investment required to exploit the opportunities. Questions 1) What are some of the most dynamic developments in the storage space? 2) How will these new storage solutions change the system as we know it? 3) What are some of the key risks or potential challenges with these new storage solutions?

11:45

The future of nuclear

More

Nuclear technologies remain one of the most divisive subjects in the energy market, with the challenges of capital cost and the perception of risk balanced against energy security, environmental concerns and an integral role in a better strategic energy future mix. This session explores the changing perspectives on nuclear energy’s role in the future energy system, the challenges and the opportunities for international cooperation alongside national priorities and explores the prospects for nuclear energy at the heart of an energy transition that delivers prosperity for all. Is a new story of nuclear energy emerging and, if so, what is “new” about it? Questions 1) How is the role of nuclear in the energy transition changing and why? 2) Are/how are political, social and investor attitudes to nuclear energy changing? 3) Which technological innovations will most impact the future of nuclear by 2040/2060? 4) Which countries will shape the future of nuclear energy to 2040 and how?

16:00 17:30

Closing Session

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